Ten Points Worth Sharing- Cleveland Area OSHA Director Howie Eberts

August 25, 2016

We attended a presentation at WIRE-Net by Cleveland OSHA Area Director Howie Eberts. Howie did a great job of giving attendees a thoughtful, human view of how and why OSHA does what it does in his district.

Informative slides were the foundation of his talk, but the takeaways revealed some interesting insights into our joint  (Companies and OSHA) efforts toward employee safety.

We all have shared responsibility for safety.

We all have shared responsibility for safety.

1)      Safety is important- not just for ourselves, but also for our families that are counting on us.

2)      On the job fatalities have declined substantially from 1974 to the present- but there are still too many.

3)      Most OSHA inspections are conducted without notice.

4)      In Cleveland region, 85% of inspections are a result of employee complaints.

5)      Be very careful posting photos on your websites or literature- If someone is obviously in the shop without wearing their required PPE…

6)      It‘s your company-

  • Why wouldn’t you want to have a prepared written plan for how your company will respond to a serious injury or fatality?
  • It’s not unreasonable to assert your rights
  • You DESERVE to be treated with respect
  • So do our Field Agents
  • How you treat our officers is on you

7)      OSHA does have the right to interview your employees privately

8)      To prove employee misconduct you need to prove all four:

  • You have a work rule
  • The rule is communicated to all employees
  • You monitor compliance
  • You issue discipline for noncompliance

9) If the agent tries to expand the scope and you don’t understand why, ask them to clarify why, if you still don’t understand, ask to speak with Howie

10) The facts show that the most dangerous thing that any of us do involves a motor vehicle; roadway incidents alone accounted for nearly one out of every four fatal work injuries.

We took a number of specific actionable tips and insights away from his presentation that we’ll be sharing exclusively with our PMPA members.

Photo credit: http://www.medinacountysafetycouncil.com/

Wire-Net: https://www.wire-net.org/

 

 


Attending IMTS-Think Differently!

August 19, 2016

About this time of year the  advice starts rolling out – have a plan so you don’t miss anything. Make a  checklist of key contacts.  Map your show. Make sure to stop at So and So’s booth for the free give-aways. Etc.  Etc. Etc.

This year, I’ll not exhort you to go to IMTS with a plan of exhibitors to visit.  I’ll not ask you to make a list of the key people that you need to connect with. And will you really have room in you bag for whatever it is that So and So  is giving away this time?

Instead, I’d like to issue you a challenge. I’m asking you to think up a theme for your visit, an idea that you would like to discover the means of achieving while at IMTS.

Several IMTS’s ago, I had just such a theme in mind. My theme was, “What can I find  here at IMTS that will help us keep manufacturing jobs here in the U.S.? That will help our talent operate at their ‘Highest and Best Use?’

At that show, I found the PAWS Workholding System, and relearned the importance of knowing my multiplication tables.

Why hold (and machine) just one part, when I can hold and machine say, 16 at once?

They never told me about this when I was learning my times tables...

They never told me about this when I was learning my times tables…

Why indeed?

  • 60% increase in parts per shift
  • 50% reduction in Operator Load and Unload Time
  • 50% reduction in Operator Tasks/ shift
  • Reduced impact on operator of repetitive motion operations (Seriously, 10 hours a day of hand clamping?)

By using an automatic clamping system and multiple part holding fixtures, the operator is able to work on higher value added tasks while the machine runs  multiple parts. And because the clamping and pressure is more consistent, so is your process.  This also frees up your higher skilled individuals  to work on other things,  allowing a lower skilled individual to load and unload the operation, while increasing consistency of workholding accuracy and force applied.

Now, you might not need a reminder about  how the times tables can work in your favor by loading 16 parts at once, I get that.

And maybe your equipment only does machine one piece at a time.

But, my challenge to you remains-

  • Don’t go to IMTS looking for what you already know.
  • Don’t go just to speak with the people that you already know.
  • Go to find something that will make a marked difference in your quality, productivity, or ability to use your talent more effectively.

Instead, ahead of time, ask yourself what would be a delightful thing to discover that could really move the needle in your shop operations and quality. While at IMTS keep your eyes open, and ask EVERYBODY if they have seen what it is that you are hoping to discover.

Yes, of course you need to see your stalwart suppliers.

But I ask you, are they the ones that will give you that unexpected new insight to reduce your operations time or tasks by 50-90%?

(I’m guessing that they have already given you their best advice and counsel.)

Or will it be something new, unexpected, and unanticipated?

By all means, make your plans of what booths to visit and who to talk to. 

That’s why most folks go to shows like IMTS.

But the REALLY BIG PAYOFF will come if you find that unanticipated, as yet undiscovered technology that will yield incredible benefits for your operations.

Success at a show like IMTS is not about making a plan- that’s a given. In my mind, it is about discovering your next surprising insight into doing what you do better- with fewer inputs and more consistently.

Think differently this trip. Discovery mode rather than checklist mode. Prepare by asking yourself “What can I find here that will…?”

And if you must have a checklist, well, try this checklist for checklists from  Projectcheck.org

You can see the PAWS workholding system at this year’s IMTS  at Booth W-2138

 


Great Info on Advanced Manufacturing at Industry Week

August 9, 2016

Mark Muro is the author of the Brookings Institution’s latest report on advanced manufacturing which we blogged about here. He is also Industry Week’s Manufacturing Leader of the Week and we are urging you to read his interview over at Industry Week.

Convincing, factual, insights about advanced manufacturing.

Convincing, factual, insights about advanced manufacturing.

Here are a couple of excerpts from his Industry Week Interview to convince you to read the full interview;

  • “The advanced (manufacturing) sector is where we can see the promise of the U.S. economy. The virtues of the advanced sector are what we want more of for our economy.”
  • “They are the single most important source of innovation.
  • “These industries dominate the private sector expenditure on R&D.
  • “They provide 60% to 70% of exports.
  • “These are the most highly productive industries we have at a time when there is a lot of concern about drifting productivity in the country.
  • “And because of this, they also pay well. There is a wage premium for people of all education levels. Half the people in the advanced industries don’t have a college degree, yet they are enjoying those wage premiums too…

“Advanced manufacturing is innovative, it’s productive, it exports, it pays well and it is inclusive.”

“Your report mentions an inclusive benefit to advanced manufacturing. Why that conclusion rather than manufacturing will become the realm of a technical elite?

“Upskilling is happening in the advanced manufacturing sector. It is not sufficient to just show up at the plant and do the same thing all day for 250 days a year. It is a more collaborative, more creative and more technical set of activities. That doesn’t mean that one has to have a college degree. Employees will require a modicum of digital skill. So much of this is about automation, computerization, CNC operation and so on. But remember that we have a lot of people retiring. There is going to be demand for workers to staff what are going to be highly productive and hopefully growing industries.”

There is much much more to this interview about workforce development, policies, and local impacts. Go to Industry Week Interview to get the complete story about advanced Manufacturing impacts.

Thanks Industry Week for this insightful, make-a-difference coverage.


July 2016 ISM PMI- Down from June but Fifth Month of Expansion for Manufacturing

August 1, 2016

The July PMI® registered 52.6 percent, a decrease of 0.6 percentage point from the June reading of 53.2 percent. Economic activity in the manufacturing sector expanded in July for the fifth consecutive month, while the overall economy grew for the 86th consecutive month, say the nation’s supply executives in the latest Manufacturing ISM® Report On Business®.”

“Of the 18 manufacturing industries, 11 are reporting growth in July in the following order: Textile Mills; Printing & Related Support Activities; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Wood Products; Furniture & Related Products; Chemical Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Fabricated Metal Products; Nonmetallic Mineral Products; Petroleum & Coal Products; and Computer & Electronic Products.”- Institute for Supply Management

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PMPA’s Business Trends Report for June 2016 showed surprising resilience in our respondents’ sales growth, and out-performed the FED’s IP indicator.  With profitability level and sales at fifth highest monthly level on our record, we think that when Industrial Production (IP) recovers in the broad economy, our shops will have plenty of work.

The decline in the ISM PMI from June to July suggest that the growth in Manufacturing  slowed month to month.

Chart courtesy Calculated Risk Blog.


OSHA’s Top Ten Most Frequently Cited Standards- FY 2015

July 22, 2016

OSHA Penalties increased 78% August 1, 2016.

Think of your efforts here as an investment in "Penalty Prevention."

Think of your efforts here as an investment in “Penalty Prevention.”

The following is a list of the top 10 most frequently cited standards following inspections of worksites by federal OSHA for Fiscal Year 2015.

  1. 1926.501 – Fall Protection (C)
  2. 1910.1200 – Hazard Communication
  3. 1926.451 – Scaffolding (C)
  4. 1910.134 – Respiratory Protection
  5. 1910.147 – Lockout/Tagout
  6. 1910.178 – Powered Industrial Trucks
  7. 1926.1053 – Ladders (C)
  8. 1910.305 – Electrical, Wiring Methods
  9. 1910.212 – Machine Guarding
  10. 1910.303 – Electrical, General Requirements

Note,  the standards that are numbered 1926.XXX – Numbers 1. Fall protection, 3. Scaffolding, and 7. Ladders, are Construction industry, rather than General Industry. Nevertheless, Fall Protection and Ladders are relevant in our manufacturing shops as well. Source: Top Ten Standards 2015

In our work with shops involved in OSHA inspections, we have learned that failure to have documented training and evidence is the more likely to be the root cause of the citation. You must train and you must be able to provide documentary evidence of the training.

A savvy management will take steps in their shops to find and fix recognized hazards addressed in these and other standards before OSHA shows up.

 

Action Steps:

  1. Electrical-On your next walk around the shop, look for outlets and power boxes that are not in good condition and schedule their repair ASAP. If you can see wiring or damage- that is likely a violation.
  2. Machine GuardingThis is a particular area of OSHA emphasis. Are all provided guards in place, or are they being removed or defeated? Each instance would be a violation.
  3. Lockout/TagoutThis too is an OSHA emphasis and on their regulatory agenda for review. Now would be a good time to review that all affected employees have been trained. That evidence exists of that training. And that you have audited  to assure performance. (If I went into your shop and saw a machine undergoing a major changeover, would I find it locked out?)

Photocredit

 

 


Prepare Now to Avoid OSHA Penalty Increases August 1, 2016

July 21, 2016

“In November 2015, Congress enacted legislation requiring federal agencies to adjust their civil penalties to account for inflation. The Department of Labor is adjusting penalties for its agencies, including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

OSHA’s maximum penalties, which were last adjusted in 1990, will increase by 78%. Going forward, the agency will continue to adjust its penalties for inflation each year based on the Consumer Price Index.

The new penalties will take effect after August 1, 2016.  Any citations issued by OSHA after that date will be subject to the new penalties if the related violations occurred after November 2, 2015.” –OSHA News Release

OSHA Penalties to increase August 1, 2016. 78% increase for maximum penalties.

OSHA Penalties to increase August 1, 2016. 78% increase for maximum penalties.

Here is a schedule of the penalties from the OSHA announcement:

OSHA table

What can you do to minimize the impact of these new penalties:

  • Audit your program.
  • Audit your training.
  • Audit your records.

PMPA members that may not be aware of  all of the training that is mandated by OSHA for our shops can download our January  “Safety-Employer Musts Table” Here

Here is a link to our original post on the increase from last year


June 2016 ISM PMI- Stronger Than Our Order Book!

July 11, 2016

The latest Institute for Supply Management Purchasing Manager’s Index (ISM PMI) for June 2016 increased 1.9 percent from May 2016, the fourth consecutive increase  in the index and the 85th consecutive month of increase in the overall economy.

This performance is stronger than our shops are seeing, and so we hope it bodes well for  contract machining orders to pick up in the near future…

Improvement over May 2016

Improvement over May 2016

“The June PMI® registered 53.2 percent, an increase of 1.9 percentage points from the May reading of 51.3 percent. The New Orders Index registered 57 percent, an increase of 1.3 percentage points from the May reading of 55.7 percent. The Production Index registered 54.7 percent, 2.1 percentage points higher than the May reading of 52.6 percent. The Employment Index registered 50.4 percent, an increase of 1.2 percentage points from the May reading of 49.2 percent. Inventories of raw materials registered 48.5 percent, an increase of 3.5 percentage points from the May reading of 45 percent. The Prices Index registered 60.5 percent, a decrease of 3 percentage points from the May reading of 63.5 percent, indicating higher raw materials prices for the fourth consecutive month. Manufacturing registered growth in June for the fourth consecutive month, as 12 of our 18 industries reported an increase in new orders in June (down from 14 in May), and 12 of our 18 industries reported an increase in production in June (same as in May).”

“Of the 18 manufacturing industries, 13 are reporting growth in June in the following order: Printing & Related Support Activities; Textile Mills; Petroleum & Coal Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Fabricated Metal Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Paper Products; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Computer & Electronic Products; Chemical Products; Primary Metals; Machinery; and Nonmetallic Mineral Products. The three industries reporting contraction in June are: Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Transportation Equipment; and Plastics & Rubber Products.”

Is the ISM PMI a leading indicator for our precision machining shops shipments in the short term?  In May 2016, the PMPA Business Trends Index declined 8 points or 6.6% to 114, its lowest value for the month since May 2011. A majority of respondents reported sales declines in May. We certainly hope that this ISM PMI is a leading indicator for our shops!

ISM PMI News release June 2016 PMI

ISM PMI graph courtesy Calculated Risk Blog


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