Quality Quote

October 10, 2018

No spec, no quality. Know Spec, know quality.

Quality means compliance with all terms of the specification.

Know the specification!

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Teamwork Leads to AS9100 Certification

February 18, 2014

“With aerospace function and safety criticality, we absolutely need to know the status and location of every piece that could be considered a part. We have definitely upped our performance in the accuracy,  flow and knowledge of status of “what’s in the bin.””- Tammy Wilson.

Permac Industries recently announced that they were just awarded their AS9100 certification, on their first try.  AS9100 Certification is required by many OEM’s in the Aerospace industry.

Lots of Teamwork.

Lots of Teamwork.

I asked  a group of employees at Permac what were the unexpected challenges and what made their efforts work.

If you are a manager, you might want to jot a few of these down.

Challenges

  • Weren’t able to foresee many of the additional requirements.
  • Weren’t able to understand the impact of some of these requirements on our processes;
  • Weren’t really expecting additional paperwork- Our previous experience with Quality System implementations were that they helped us lean out our paperwork;
  • Really had to embrace the Authority of piece count and build processes based on count.

Enablers of Success

  • We really did have the right people  in place;
  • Those people had both the responsibility and authority to make the system and process improvements demanded by the AS9100 standard;
  • They had management support when the changes were difficult to implement
  • They felt that management was confident in their ability to make the changes.

Members of the team told me that

  • Having strong existing systems made their job easier- they didn’t have to reinvent anything.
  • They did need to tighten up procedures;
  • They did need to add some additional procedures;
  • They have focused more on supplier and production control

Congratulations to the team at Permac for getting this done right first time.

Do you have a success story to share?


Three Rules of Thumb

September 17, 2013

The Three Rules of Thumb are:

  1. Does this action attempt to deceive anyone or allow anyone to be deceived?
  2. Does this action gain or allow the gain of privilege or advantage to which I, or someone else would not otherwise be entitled?
  3. Would I be dissatisfied by the outcome if I were on the receiving end of this action?
 If you answered No to each of these, you are good to go.


If you answered “No” to each of these, you are good to go.


Congratulations- 122 Women in Manufacturing Honored at STEP Awards by Manufacturing Institute.

February 7, 2013

When I started in manufacturing, “The Gals” were in the office- not the shop.

122  women who make a difference in Manufacturing today

122 women who make a difference in Manufacturing today

The inaugural group of 122 STEP honorees recognized by the Manufacturing Institute on February 5th in Washington D.C.  showed me that the times have changed and that there are many, many ways  that women can and do meaningfully contribute to manufacturing at their companies as

  • Plant and Production Managers,
  • Operations,
  • Engineers,
  • Technologists,
  • Process Control,
  • Regulatory Affairs,
  • Certified Welders,
  • CNC Machine Operators,
  • Weld Process Specialists,
  • Quality Control,
  • Health,
  • Environment,
  • Process Safety,
  • Chief Financial Officer,
  • Designers and Design Engineers,
  • Compliance Officers,
  • Chief Scientists,
  • Safety,
  • Quality,
  • Black Belts,
  • Training and Apprenticeship Instructors,
  • Manufacturing Lead,
  • Product Development,
  • Sales and Marketing,
  • Information Technology,
  • Lead Analyst,
  • Business Development,
  • Continuous Improvement,
  • Planning and Shipping,
  • Designer,s and Design Engineers
  • Information Security,
  • Assembly,
  • Legal and Corporate Affairs,
  • Systems Development,
  • President,
  • CEO
  • Owners

I am certain that I missed a few…

PMPA is proud to recognize our member and Vice President Darlene Miller, CEO of Permac Industries in Burnsville MN as one of this inaugural group of honorees.

Darlene Miller Nak“Darlene’s leadership  reaches far beyond PERMAC. As a member of the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness she recognized the need for trained high skill workers and led the creation of Right Skills Now training program and helped support the 10,000 Engineers nationwide engineering student retention program. She was named small business person of the year in 2008 by the U.S. Chamber, and serves as an officer and board member at PMPA as well as a number of other nonprofits.”

Congratulations to Darlene and all the women recognized for their vital role in manufacturing today. And thanks to the Manufacturing Institute for helping raise the awareness of the vital need for the talents that these and all women bring to our shops.

Yes, I would like to see my daughter get into manufacturing. Wouldn’t you?


How Do You Choose The Best Supplier?- Steve Staub

December 13, 2012

Guest post by Steve Staub, Made In Dayton Blog

Steve Posts on Made In Dayton Blog

Steve Posts on Made In Dayton Blog

We have enjoyed many of Steve’s posts via Linked In, this one I just HAD. TO. SHARE.

I was contacted recently by a potential customer asking for our hourly shop rate. When I asked him why, he said it was so that he could compare our services against that of our competitors. I told him that our hourly rate doesn’t really matter when looking at the overall cost of manufacturing a part and choosing the right supplier.

He did not understand what I was talking about so I went on to explain it like this. Let’s say that Company X has a new state of the art Whatzit machine and Company Z has a 10 year old Whatzit machine. Company X charges $ 100.00 per hour on their machine, Company Z charges $50.00 per hour on the machine that they have. Which company are you going to choose?
I’m guessing that you have decided to go with Company Z because they charge only $50.00 per hour. But, did you know that with technology improvements a new Whatzit machine is actually 50% faster than they were just 10 years ago? This actually makes the price the same between the two companies… or at least close.
But what if the pricing wasn’t the same? Let’s say that two companies quoted production of a part and Company A came in around 10% cheaper than Company B. Do you automatically give the project to Company A? If you do, you’re certainly not alone. Many companies do this all the time and the lowest price always wins. But is it really a lower price if you have a lot of rework? Is it truly a better price if the project is late?  Here are some questions I like to ask to really find the lowest overall cost:

  • Does this company have a track record of on-time delivery?
  • How is their quality and what is their rejection rate?
  • Can they track my material and offer material certification?
  • How easy are they to deal with?
  • Will a real human answer the phone?
  • Are they convenient to get to or are they located in the middle of nowhere?
  • Are they ISO certified and do they have a Continuous Improvement plan?
  • Are they the newest kid on the block or are they an established, stable company with an Outside Board of Advisors?

All of these questions (and likely more) need to be answered to make sure that you are dealing with a reliable and reputable company that is going to provide you with a good value and be around to service you for years to come. I’m not saying this is the only way to evaluate a supplier. I’m just sharing some things to think about.

So… how do you choose?

Why Service Trumps Quality And Price

February 9, 2012

In the precision machining business, nobody sets up their machines based on the quality or price of your barstock. They set up their machines based on your delivery (service).

We don't set them up because of your price.

Ability to provide your product on time and to specification is the true determinant in the real world of execution. Thats why there is a gap between the dream world of  business plans (what we think we can get) and the real world of monthly operating statements (what we got).

The delta (difference) between the two is a failure of some supplier to service (provide what needed as needed as planned.)

  • Quality: Either the quality of the product meets requirements, or else you will get claim/return and won’t get the order (again).
  • Price: You will meet the market price for whatever comparables exist for the same requirements- or else the lowest priced comparable product will be selected.
  • Service is the only differentiator in my experience;

 Therefore it is only your ability to serve the customer with immediate delivery/ provision as needed that is a differentiator.

PS.:  Consumers consider service to be part of the landed cost, and don’t want to pay extra for it. In the industrial sector, service  is a given.

PPS.:  Everything else is Marketing B.S.


Goodbye Steve Jobs. A Dented Universe Bids You Farewell

October 5, 2011

Our condolences to everyone at Apple on the loss of Visionary in Chief and Denter of the Universe Steve Jobs.

We are grateful for Steve’s exemplary commitment to design and technical excellence.

One person can make a difference.

Steve Jobs did.

Thank you Steve!