Where The Jobs Are- USA Today

November 14, 2014

Titled “More High Schools Teach Manufacturing Skills” the article confirms that ” U.S. high schools that have launched or revived manufacturing programs in recent years to guide students toward good-paying jobs and help fill a critical shortage of skilled machinists, welders and maintenance technicians.”

Here are a couple of points that they make that are worth sharing:

  • There is a glaring imbalance in the labor market. Despite high unemployment since the recession, manufacturers still struggle to fill hundreds of thousands of job openings.
  • Manufacturing is dogged by an outdated image
  • Manufacturing is “Actually,you’re working with computers and robots that are doing what you used to do by hand. That requires a skill set (in math and science) above what was required a generation ago.”
  • Community colleges also are turning out more prospective employees but not keeping up with demand. Nationwide, community colleges awarded 1,557 associate degrees or certificates in manufacturing last year, according to the American Association of Community Colleges. That’s up from 616 in 2005 but below the nearly 1,600 doled out in 2000.

In addition,  the USA Today piece has some informative graphics and video clips.

Here are some facts to consider.

Here are some facts to consider.

But the best takeaway from this piece is a quote from a student whose engagement with the manufacturing class has improved his grade performance and motivation:

With this class, I have the motivation…It’s a way out, I don’t want to be working at McDonald’s.”

Thank you USA Today for this positive story.


Manufacturing’s Sputnik Moment- Now is the Time!

August 13, 2013

We need to change the community perception that manufacturing  is “not deserving/worthy enough” for their kids. With the majority of recent college grads un-employed, under employed, and underwater on their debts, and lucky to get part time work, careers in manufacturing for people with skills offer rewarding challenging fulltime employment that makes a difference in the lives of us all.- Speaking of Precision

This post originally appeared on MAGNET’s  Manufacturing Success blog and is reposted with permission.

Is This Our Sputnik Moment?

By Fatima Weathers, Executive Vice President, MAGNET

Fatima Weathers, Executive Vice President, MAGNET

At a recent conference I attended in Washington, D.C., panelists from industry, academia and labor gathered to discuss manufacturing’s next step.

Several panelists described the current manufacturing environment as being on the edge of a new era that is being driven by widespread and affordable access to 3-D printing and cloud computing.

Only mentioned in passing were the usual barriers to growth like unfair trade, taxes, labor costs and access to capital. Indeed, much of the discussion focused on the debate surrounding immigration laws. Many attendees and panelists agreed that access to highly skilled talent is the factor that will tip the scales for gaining the competitive edge in the U.S.

One panelist challenged manufacturers by describing the current environment as our “Sputnik Moment”—either grasp this fleeting window of opportunity to lead through innovation and talent or forever miss the moment to be the global leader in manufacturing.

What do you think? Is this our “Sputnik Moment?” What do you think is the most important factor manufacturers face right now? Respond below, or email me atfatima.weathers@magnetwork.org. We look forward to hearing from you!

You can read the original post here.


Where The Jobs Are- Mark Tomlinson in Huffington Post

April 5, 2013

The manufacturing industry is facing an employment crisis. The rate of technical advances has outpaced our ability to educate and train workers on new machines and applications, creating a “skills gap.”Mark Tomlinson, CEO, Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

Skilled machinists positions continue to be open in our industry.

Skilled machinists positions continue to be open in our industry.

I thought it was interesting that even during the depths of the last recession, the classified ads in the major newspapers still showed opportunities for setup and machinists in our precision machining sector of advanced manufacturing. It’s still true today. We have visited local community colleges  around the country that provide machining training and we hear the same story, after the first semester, “most of our students already have found a job or have one promised upon graduation.”

Here’s more from Mark-

“This is a great time to work in manufacturing. We’re applying once pie-in-the-sky technologies to real-world needs: creating strong yet flexible limb replacements for our wounded warriors, robots that crawl into the fuselage of an aircraft, mountain bikes for extreme enthusiasts, engineered for safety pushing the boundaries of men and machine. It’s stuff that captures the imagination.

“Yet students are not pursuing these jobs despite the cool factor. Some of it is institutional and some of it is perception. A major challenge is there is no academic infrastructure to administer STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) curriculum on a national scale. That’s compounded by a lack interest in STEM by educators, parents and students who may be more inclined toward attending a four-year college.”

We need to help change the perception of manufacturing and skilled trades.  In educators, parents, and students.

We need to help change the notion that going heavily into debt for a bachelors degree without a plan for return on investment (ROI)is the weay fofr our sons and daughters to get their start in life.

We need to show parents, students, counselors, teachers, our communities, the “existential joys of manufacturing”- the cool stuff we make, the high tech machines we use to make it, and the broad math, science, problemsolving intellectual skill set that we bring to our work.

That our skilled machinists are worthy of the highest respect.

Mark Tomlinson told the Huffington Post “We know where the jobs are.”

Indeed.

If you would like to investigate a career in advanced manufacturing / precision machining- we’ve prepared a a database to help you access training resources wherever you are. PMPA Career Info Database.

For more info you can also  search on “Manufacturing,” “Skills,” or “Career” in this blog’s search box in the upper right corner.

Or go to PMPA website Careers section.

Photo


Darlene Miller at Clinton Global Initiative- Getting Skilled Workers

June 19, 2012

Darlene Miller was interviewed by President Bill Clinton at Clinton Global Initiative in Chicago recently.

Darlene Miller, President and CEO of Permac Industries,  Vice President of PMPA, gave an employer’s perspective of Right Skills Now during a panel discussion about developing talent to continue economic recovery that has been led by manufacturing.

Darlene ‘s segment begins at 9:00 in the below video.

Clinton asks  “Why is manufacturing recovering  and growing  again, and what are the constraints to finding workers, and what have you done about it?”

Miller answers “US manufactures as much as Brazil, Russia, India and China combined. We need skilled people- to fill over 600,000 openings we have. But we don’t need just labor, we need skilled people. We started Right Skills Now to help people get the skills they need for a career in Advanced Manufacturing.”

Video: Jumpstart America Clinton Global Initiative. (Advance to 9:00 to hear Mr. Clinton’s and Ms. Miller’s exchange.)

Right Skills Now

PMPA provides staff support to Ms. Miller and her work on the President’s Job Council and Right Skills Now. Our precision machining companies are looking for people with skills and talent to get a great career in advanced manufacturing.


Manufacturing IS My Future- I Can Make More Money

March 16, 2012

BREAKING NEWS:

PMPA Member W.H.Bagshaw Company and employee featured on CNN Money!

Making it in the USA.

Jonathan Pratt at W.H.Bagshhaw says: “I picked up newer manufacturing techniques quickly. I am learning new things every day. I think I can move up the ranks here and make more money.

Manufacturing is my lifetime career. There’s always going be a manufacturing job out there for me. I know my skills are in high demand.

We need more Americans on board with manufacturing. It’s steady and stable work. I really hope people grasp that and that Made in USA flourishes again.”

We couldn’t agree more, Jonathan!

Find yourself in a career in advanced manufacturing!


Manufacturing Careers, Not Just Jobs

November 17, 2011

Precision Machining is a branch of fabricated metals manufacturing that continues to have a high demand for people with skills.

Even at the depths of the last recession, I saw want ads in the major papers in cities across the country from companies looking for skilled machinists, setup men, and toolmakers- people with skills.

So with job openings even during a recession,  Precision Machining is a great industry to find a job.

What many people don’t realize is that its also a great place to find a career.

PMPA Technical Member Peterson Tool Company recently honored 24 employees for 25 years of service.

Finding a job is an important part of having a quality life. Finding a job that sustains a career and lifelong employment is- well as you can see from this photo- its  not all that rare in the precision machining industry. Here is a company that recently honored 24  of their employees for 25 years or more service.

That’s a Career!

Congratulations to PMPA Technical Member Peterson Tool Company.

Congratulations to the 24 employees who have collectively achieved over 600 years of industry knowledge and experience at Peterson Tool Company.

If you are already working in the precision machining industry, congratulations on your great career choice.

If you are not working in precision machining and would like to and can do the math, the people pictured above are examples of what you to could have in our industry- a great career with a great employer.

Peterson Tool Company