Labor Participation Rate- Even HUFFPOST Figures It Out!

April 5, 2013

The labor participation rate fell to 66.3 percent it’s lowest level in 34 years in March. What recovery?

Recovery? HA!

Recovery? HA!

Even the Huffington Post has figured out that we have a structural unemployment problem:

With more than 3 million open and available jobs on the career website CareerBliss.com alone, why do we keep seeing the labor participation rate dropping?

The answer is that employers can’t find the right workers. Too many unemployed American workers lack the relevant skills needed to fill the millions of jobs available.” -Heidi Golledge

That sure doesn’t sound like ‘cyclical unemployment’ to me.

Here’s more from HuffPost: “If you look at the current employment numbers there is a quality job out there for just about every graduate — if only they would have been guided toward courses of study that would give them the skills most in demand. We can start to bridge the skills gap now by guiding future workers toward growing and emerging industries.”

Sounds like the definition of structural unemployment to me: Structural unemployment is a form of unemployment which occurs when the number of vacancies is equal to, or greater than, the number of the unemployed. The unemployed workers may lack the skills needed for the jobs, or they may not live in the part of the country or world where the jobs are available.

We have been talking about this issue for some time- here, here, here, here are some of our most recent ones.

For a great (but ominous) discussion of just how bad this is, read The Market Ticker’s post: “The Chart That Will Crash The Market.

It is about this Labor Participation Rate chart posted above.

We need to give people skills so that they can be hired. Our industry is hiring. Info about skills  and careers can be found here. Need training? Check out PMPA’s Comprehensive Training Database.

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Unemployment Rate Real Story- People Stopped Looking for Work

March 8, 2013

The reporter on NPR breathlessly gushed  about how the unemployment rate fell to 7.7 percent.

What a great story!

They then cut to someone who attibuted the fall in the unemployment rate to ‘jobs picking up in construction.’

(Around 48,000 according to BLS)

Don’t get me wrong, I agree that a gain of 236,000 jobs in February is a significant improvement over the paltry 119,000 reported in January.

But it is nowhere  near the 363,000 needed each month to bring our official unemployment rate back down into the neighborhood of 6 percent.

What the reporters are not explaining to you is that in February,  the adult population grew buy 165,000, yet the labor force actually decreased 130,0000 as 295,000 additional adults chose not to look for work.

Over a  hundred thousand more adults fell out of the labor force in February than found jobs!

LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION RATE FEB 2013

Jobs haven't even begun to recover. This is the real unemployment story.

Jobs haven’t even begun to recover. This is the real unemployment story.

What does this mean?

It means that the real unemployment rate U-6 is 14.3 %

14.3 percent is the real number for total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force. Source- Bureau of Labor Statistics.

So that 7.7 % figure the breathless news reporters are giving you is wrong.

The reporters are understating by about 50% the actual unemployment rate.

7.7 percent is 54 percent of 14.2 percent.

46% is a fairly large margin of error or “understatement.”

There is hope.

There are jobs for people with skills in advanced manufacturing.

Here is a link to a quick video where I show a list of job openings posted at Cuyahoga Community College Advanced Workforce Center.

If you can take two semesters of skills training at a local community college, you could find yourself working in advanced manufacturing by the second semester.

Labor Participation Rate Graph

Professor Peter Morici of University of Maryland contributed some sensemaking to this post.


Unemployment Situation Is A Gooey Mess

January 30, 2013

Guest Post by Don Ake.

“The unique situations created by the Great Recession have rendered some traditional economic indicators unreliable.  And I believe that the indicator that has been impacted the most is the Unemployment Rate (U-3) reported by the U.S. Government.”

Don Ake is an MBA and adjunct professor and blogger over at Model T Stock Trends. Don follows the Transportation sector as a leading indicator for the economy and investing.

I find his down home charm and easy to understand explanations of economic arcana to be both informative and amusing. Here’s the rest of his post:

” This post was initially supposed to be an in depth analysis of the current (U-3) Unemployment Rate. Soon after starting my research, I found myself looking at a large pile of goo (if you are unemployed you may substitute “poo” for “goo” or probably a much stronger term).  There have been several articles recently about why the Unemployment Rate is not an accurate measurement of this labor market.  People are constantly trying to adjust the rate based on a single factor.  However there are many factors impacting the job market and these factors are very difficult to measure.

U-3 unemployment rate is a gooey indicator according to Don Ake.

U-3 unemployment rate is a gooey indicator according to Don Ake.

“Sure, you can still calculate the Unemployment Rate percentage, but it is now just a statistic. It is not an accurate indicator of the job market.  It is useless to put it on a historical chart.  The recessions of the past occurred primarily in a “blue-collar” labor force.  The recession hit, workers were laid-off.  The recovery begins and people returned to work, often at their previous jobs. But the Great Recession hit all workers and created some dynamics that are very different.

“The Unemployment Rate is greatly impacted by the number of people actively looking for work (the labor participation rate).  Many people have stopped looking for work, but for many different reasons.  For example, Fred the Engineer, age 59, was downsized from his job after 30 years with his company.  In previous recessions layoffs were based on seniority, but in the Great Recession they were based on salary.  Fred looked for a job, but nobody needs an aging engineer in a slow economy, so after exhausting his severance and unemployment benefits, he decides to retire at age 62.  He is not counted as “unemployed”, but he is a“forced” retiree and would gladly be working if a job were available.

“The labor participation rate is being impacted by these “forced retirees”, people going on “disability” due to the more lenient government standards, the discouraged workers who have temporarily stopped looking due to the tepid job market.  There are also“mismatched workers” whose jobs were eliminated by new technology and who lack the skills to function in the new economy. If these people are younger, they may drop out of the labor force to be reeducated, if they are older, they often become the long-term unemployed.  And of course you have the “benefit riders”that ride their benefits out to the end, before seriously looking for work.

“The great majority of unemployed people are actively searching for work and hate being without a job.  However, in 2011 a construction worker told me he wasn’t really seeking work because he was on the “Obama Plan” and was enjoying his extended unemployment benefits. Miraculously, he found a new job just weeks after his benefits ran out.  So yes, it is true as many others have pointed out: If you pay people to be unemployed, you get more unemployed people.

“Another factor that is difficult to measure is the thousands of college graduates of the last five years who cannot find jobs in their field of study.  They either have no job or are woefully “under-employed” which may mean a job in fast food.  The underemployed (which aren’t accurately measured) also include the “Fred the Engineers” who are not old or wealthy enough to retire and are working full time at the local telemarking firm.  It is taking some professionals longer than four years to return to work in their field.

Since the Unemployment Rate is currently of marginal value, we are left with the monthly jobs reports (from the government and ADP).  And this measures the number of jobs creted, not the quality of these jobs. Replacing a manufacturing job with a call center job is not an even swap.

“The latest government report said 155,000 jobs were created in December.  This rate of job growth is woefully inadequate to provide for the millions of people seeking work (or better work).  I am hearing about more layoffs and hiring freezes from my local contacts. And the current plan for creating more jobs is“there is no plan”.

“We need more precise information to better gauge and track the employment/unemployment situation. Employment surveys need to ask people the reason they are not seeking employment, if they would work if a job was available, and whether they are“underemployed” if they have a job.  There is an opportunity here for a university or survey firm to create a new index. Hey, that would even create a few more jobs!”