May Industrial Production FED Reports Gains

“Manufacturing output rose 3.8 percent in May, but it was still 16.9 percent below its pre-pandemic level in February. The index for durable manufacturing increased 5.8 percent in May; the most sizable gain among its components was for motor vehicles and parts, where output rose substantially but also remained more than 60 percent below its February level.”

Most sophisticated manufactured goods rely on precision machined parts in order to reliably function. This is great news.

Total industrial production increased 1.4 percent in May, as many factories resumed at least partial operations following suspensions related to COVID-19. Even so, total industrial production in May was 15.4 percent below its pre-pandemic level in February. Manufacturing output—which fell sharply in March and April—rose 3.8 percent in May; most major industries posted increases, with the largest gain registered by motor vehicles and parts.”

In Real Estate, they say the most important thing is  “Location, Location, Location.”

In Economics, I’d like to tell you that it is  “Direction, Direction, Direction.”

And while 1.4%  increase in industrial production may not seem like a lot (Better than most CD’s are paying, come to think of it) the direction is, as they say

“…a turn for the better.”

Industrial Production up 1.4% in May 2020

Markets showing strength 

The major market groups posted broad-based gains in their production indexes in May, but each remained well below its pre-pandemic level.

  • consumer goods rose 3.9 percent, led by a significant rebound for automotive products.[1]
  • production of business equipment rose 5.8 percent and was boosted by a substantial increase in transit equipment as most factories producing motor vehicles and civilian aircraft reopened.
  • The indexes for defense and space equipment, construction supplies, and business supplies also recorded gains.
  • The output of materials decreased 0.8 percent, as the production of energy materials was held down by declines related to oil extraction.

Industry Groups

Manufacturing output rose 3.8 percent in May, but it was still 16.9 percent below its pre-pandemic level in February.

  • The index for durable manufacturing increased 5.8 percent in May; the most sizable gain among its components was for motor vehicles and parts, where output rose substantially but also remained more than 60 percent below its February level.
  • Durable goods industries that recorded production increases between 8 percent and 10 percent include nonmetallic mineral products, aerospace and miscellaneous transportation equipment, and furniture and related products.
  • The index for nondurables rose 2.1 percent, with advances of around 10 percent or more for textile and product mills, for apparel and leather, for printing and support, and for plastics and rubber products. The output of other manufacturing (publishing and logging) moved up 2.5 percent.

Now the levels are not back to prior Pandemic readings. But we have certainly flattened the curve Virus wise!

Chart from Washington Post reported in AIER

“Direction, Direction, Direction.”  This is why we remain positive.

FED Reserve IP May 2020

What spike? AIER

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s